Horses and Carts: can policies in a post Brexit world harness farming to more sustainable diets?

Horses and Carts: can policies in a post Brexit world harness farming to more sustainable diets?

Speaker: David Baldock

When: Wednesday 16th November 2016, 4pm

About the talk: The shape of a healthier, lower carbon diet for a more equitable world is now emerging. It is markedly different from the trajectory of food production in the UK and Europe more widely. If it is adopted a wide panorama of changes will be required and there is a fresh lens for re-examining a series of questions for consideration in the UK as  food and agricultural policy come under the spotlight post Brexit. Where is the best place to produce which foods in the long term? How can we trade off different social priorities like full accountability in the food chain, vibrant farming communities, resilient food supply, healthier ecosystems and an appropriate role for livestock farming? How should a farming sector, heavily dependent on livestock production, be helped to evolve in a world where diets should move in a different direction? How much policy intervention can be accepted either by farmers or consumers? Who has legitimacy in this arena which is both increasingly domestic and potentially more global? These questions need to be rehearsed more critically if  the UK is ready to build more future focussed policies.

About the Speaker: David Baldock was the Executive Director of IEEP until July and is now a Senior Fellow. He has had a career in independent policy institutes, working closely with public institutions and NGOs as well as academics. He joined the Institute for European Environmental Policy (IEEP) in 1984 and became Director in 1998 – establishing the Brussels office two years later. He has written about and engaged in, many aspects of European environmental, agricultural, climate, food and related policies. One of his main interests has been the effort to re-think and re-work agricultural policy into new agendas (accidentally becoming a CAP “expert” in the process). Recently, this has led to a growing involvement in debates on food, energy and the shaping of the bio-economy. Over the last year he has led projects on the environmental and agricultural dimensions of Brexit and its aftermath as well as participating in numerous events on this theme. This seems set to continue.